Category Archives: technology

Automated assembly

Researcher in Singapore have succeeded in building a robot, which are able to assemble an IKEA chair. Though the robots are still a bit slower than a human being, this kind of technology is interesting.

As many countries are facing an aging population, automation will be necessary to avoid a labor shortage. Also space settlements will benefit from this technology, as it will allow them to achieve economic independence by reducing the need to import manufactured goods.

Situational crime prevention

According to the crime opportunity theory the main cause of crime is the opportunity for prospective criminals to commit crime. Consequently crime can be reduced by eliminating opportunities for committing crimes, a strategy also known as situational prevention. In other words, by making it harder for people to commit crimes, more would-be offenders will abstain from illegal activities. Continue reading Situational crime prevention

Proton batteries

At The Guardian I found a very interesting article:

Look, no lithium! First rechargeable proton battery created.

According to the article, a team of researchers at the RMIT University in Melbourne have created a battery that instead of scarce lithium, uses carbon and hydrogen. The main benefit of this new type of battery, is that carbon and hydrogen are abundant and hence cheap materials.

With the increased popularity of electric vehicles, the demand for batteries increases and hence the demand for lithium and also its price. The limited abundance of lithium is a serious bottleneck for a more sustainable fleet of cars.

According to the scientists who made this proton battery it will take five to ten years, before it will be commercially available.

Radiation protection

Cosmic radiation is one of the most serious dangers to human spaceflight and hence a serious issue for space colonization. Consequently radiation protection is no luxury for space settlers and without this space colonization is unlikely to succeed.

Researchers at the Australian National University have developed a new nano material that could reflect cosmic radiation. A thin film of the material could provide radiation protection of astronauts and space settlers. Compared to other shielding techniques this material appears to offer a light-weight protection.